An introduction to contemporary health issues and holistic medicine

Preliminary Distinctions Rapid developments in the natural sciences and technology including biotechnology have greatly facilitated better living conditions and increased the standard of living of people worldwide. On the other hand, there are undesirable consequences, such as nuclear waste, water and air pollution, the clearing of tropical forests, and large-scale livestock farming, as well as particular innovations such as gene technology and cloning, which have caused qualms and even fears concerning the future of humankind. Lacunae in legal systems, for example, regarding abortion and euthanasia, additionally are a cause of grave concern for many people.

An introduction to contemporary health issues and holistic medicine

Mental Health and Palliative Care: Exploring the Ideological Interface. International Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation. This paper seeks to address this hiatus by presenting findings from a qualitative research project on end-of-life care for patients in a mental health institution called The Park, Centre for Mental Health, located in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

In particular, this discussion will focus on the findings from the project which highlight the similarity in philosophy between palliative care and mental health practice. The similarity which includes a person centred practice, relationship- based connectedness, a belief in compassionate, holistic care, respect for autonomy and choice, quality of life issues, family as the unit of care and need for a democratic and multi- discipline work teamwill be described.

It will be argued that the common philosophical meeting ground is an excellent foundation for integrating palliative care, now recognised as best-practice end-of-life care, into mental health service delivery. In short, the shared practice values and vision between these two disciplines provide an optimistic starting point from which to plan to address the lack of hospice and palliative care service delivery in mental health.

Introduction The mental health literature indicates that there are many factors that point to the need for serious consideration of end-of-life issues for psychiatric patients.

Foremost of these concerns is the excess mortality and higher case fatality rate for patients within the mental health system with cancer. Indeed, the evidence indicates that high rates of medical co- morbidity and premature death are now considered normative health outcomes for individuals with mental illness 2.

Mortality among psychiatric patients not only remains high, but there is evidence that it is increasing 3. The second concern is that mortality concerns in mental health are not just associated with traditional palliative care diagnostic categories, but extend to the equally serious incidence of death by suicide 4,5.

Studies of psychiatric patients indicate that the highest cause-specific mortality rate is for deaths due to suicide 3. Of considerable worry is the fact that excess mortality risk is concentrated in the first few years after first contact with mental health services 3.

In summary, then, statistical information demonstrates that people with a mental illness have an excess mortality, a reduced life expectancy and die from ten to fifteen years earlier than the general population 2,6,7,8. The only work that exists is about liaison psychiatry working with patients with stress and depression in mainstream hospice services 9, There is neither research nor commentary on end-of-life services for patients within the mental health system.

Thus, this paper seeks to address this hiatus by presenting findings from a qualitative research project on end-of-life care for patients in a mental health institution called The Park, Centre for Mental Health, located in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

The Research Mindful of the lack of research on palliative care in a mental health setting, the principal aim of the research project was to document the experience of providing end-of-life care to patients for health care workers in an institutional mental health setting at TPCMH.

An introduction to contemporary health issues and holistic medicine

The work was carried out by a Central Queensland University post-doctoral research fellow with a background in palliative care research and infrastructure links to TPCMH. Participants were verbally informed of their rights in research and written consent was obtained for participation in the research.This course is designed to provide an overview on epidemiology and the Internet for medical and health related students around the world based on the concept of Global Health Network University and Hypertext Comic Books.

Basic legal issues surrounding holistic healing include licensure and credentialing, malpractice, professional discipline and questions of food and drug law.

Alternative medicine - Wikipedia See Article History Alternative Title: CAM Complementary and alternative medicine CAMany of various approaches intended to improve or maintain human health that are not part of standard medical care, also known as conventional, or Western, medicine.

AHS — Introduction to Holistic Health Care Explores the relationships among psychology, health, illness, and behavioral medicine. Considers important contemporary health issues from biopsychological and psychosocial perspectives and the role of psychology in health promotion. Prerequisites: Junior standing and PSY or HNR aaina - a mental health advocacy newsletter published in India First four as pdfs.

issues to as html. issue one: Volume 1, no March Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), any of various approaches intended to improve or maintain human health that are not part of standard medical care, also known as conventional, or Western, urbanagricultureinitiative.com various approaches of CAM typically are used in a manner that is complementary to standard medical practices or are used in place of standard medicine.

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