The reintroduction of gray wolves into yellowstone

At Bonnier Corporation, your privacy is important to us. This Privacy Policy applies to all of the products, services, and websites offered by Bonnier Corporation and its subsidiaries or affiliated companies collectively, "Bonnier". To better protect your privacy, we provide this notice explaining our privacy practices and the choices you can make about the way your information is collected and used by Bonnier.

The reintroduction of gray wolves into yellowstone

The five last known The reintroduction of gray wolves into yellowstone Mexican gray wolves were captured in in accordance with an agreement between the United States and Mexico intended to save the critically endangered subspecies.

Between and a comprehensive captive breeding program brought Mexican wolves back from the brink of extinction.

Over captive Mexican wolves were part of the recovery program. The ultimate goal for these wolves, however, is to reintroduce them to areas of their former range. The final goal for Mexican wolf recovery is a wild, self-sustaining population of at least individuals.

Grey wolf packs were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park and Idaho starting in The subspecies native to the Yellowstone area prior to extirpation was the Northern Rocky Mountains wolf Canis lupus irremotus however the species that was reintroduced was the Mackenzie Valley wolf Canis lupus occidentalis though both subspecies were similar and their range overlapped across the region needs citation.

Such classification gave government officials greater leeway in managing wolves to protect livestock, which was considered one of a series of compromises wolf reintroduction proponents made with concerned local ranchers.

Indeed, local industry and environmental groups battled for decades over the Yellowstone and Idaho wolf reintroduction effort. The idea of wolf reintroduction was first brought to Congress in by biologists who were concerned with the critically high elk populations in Yellowstone and the ecological damages to the land from excessively large herds.

When the wolves were eradicated and hunting eliminated, the elk population boomed. Over the succeeding decades, elk populations grew so large that they unbalanced the local ecosystem. The number of elk and other large prey animals increased to the point that they gathered in large herds along valley bottoms and meadows overgrazing new-growth vegetation.

Because of overgrazing, deciduous woody plant species such as upland aspen and riparian cottonwood became seriously diminished. So, because the keystone predators, the wolves, had been removed from the Yellowstone-Idaho ecosystem, the ecosystem changed.

This change affected other species as well. Booming coyote numbers, furthermore, also had a negative effect on other species, particularly the red foxpronghorn, and domestic sheep. Ranchers, though, remained steadfastly opposed to reintroducing a species of animal that they considered to be analogous to a plague, citing the hardships that would ensue with the potential loss of stock caused by wolves.

A wolf recovery team was appointed inand the first official recovery plan was released for public comment in General public apprehension regarding wolf recovery forced the U.

Fish and Wildlife Service to revise their plan to implement more control for local and state governments, so a second recovery plan was released for public comment in The preparation of an environmental impact statement, the last critical step before reintroduction could be green-lighted, was halted when Congress insisted that further research be done before an Environmental Impact Statement EIS was to be funded.

That same year, a final recovery plan was released. Following a long period of research, public education, and public commenting, a draft EIS was released for public review in and it received overcomments from interested parties. Though the original plan called for three recovery zones — one in Idaho, another in Montanaand a final one in the Greater Yellowstone Area — the Montana recovery zone was eliminated from the final EIS after it had been proven that a small, but breeding population had already established itself in the northwestern part of the state.

The plan stipulated that each of the three recovery areas must have ten breeding pairs of wolves successfully rearing two or more pups for three consecutive years before the minimum recovery goals would be reached.

Reintroduced wolves being carried to acclimation pens, Yellowstone National Park, January A pair of lawsuits filed in late put the recovery plan in jeopardy. While one of the lawsuits was filed by the Wyoming Farm Bureau, the other was filed by a coalition of concerned environmental groups including the Idaho Conservation League and Audubon Society.

The latter group pointed to unofficial wolf sightings as proof that wolves had already migrated down to Yellowstone from the north, which, they argued, made the plan to reintroduce an experimental population in the same area unlawful. Nevertheless, both cases were thrown out on January 3, Adolescent members from packs of Mackenzie Valley wolves in Alberta, Canada were tranquilized and carted down to the recovery zones later that week, but a last minute court order delayed the planned releases.

The reintroduction of gray wolves into yellowstone

The stay came from an appellate court in Denver and was instigated by the Wyoming Farm Bureau. After spending an additional 36 hours in transport cages in Idaho and in their holding pens in Yellowstone, the wolves were finally released following official judicial sanction. A total of 66 wolves were released to the two areas in this manner in January and January This includes approximately packs two or more wolves traveling together and 71 breeding pairs male and female that successfully rear a litter of at least two until Dec.

The recovery goal for the area was revised to 30 breeding pairs total, and this number has been surpassed for some time. While the majority of wolves ignore livestock entirely, a few wolves or wolf packs will become chronic livestock hunters, and most of these have been killed to protect livestock.When the gray wolf was eradicated from Yellowstone National Park in the s, more was lost than just the noble and fascinating predator.

In the Valley of the Wolves Reintroduction of the.

In , gray wolves were first reintroduced into Yellowstone in the Lamar Valley. The history of wolves in Yellowstone chronicles the extirpation, absence and reintroduction of gray wolves to Yellowstone, and how the reintroduction was not without controversy or surprises for . gray wolves could be reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho, the process used to develop the alternatives, and the environmental consequences of implementing each alternative. Three alternatives (Reintroduction of Experimental Populations [the FWS’s proposal], Wolf. Yellowstone National Park ensures the long-term viability of wolves in Greater Yellowstone and provides a place for research on how wolves may affect many aspects of the ecosystem.

Yellowstone National Park ensures the long-term viability of wolves in Greater Yellowstone and provides a place for research on how wolves may affect many aspects of the ecosystem. The US Fish and Wildlife Service Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery Plan proposed reintroduction of an “experimental population” of wolves into Yellowstone.

An experimental population, under section 10(j) of the Endangered Species Act, is considered nonessential and allows more management flexibility.

Gray wolves were reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park in , resulting in a trophic cascade through the entire ecosystem. After the wolves were driven extinct in the region nearly years ago, scientists began to fully understand their role in the food web as a keystone species. Gray wolves were reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park in , resulting in a trophic cascade through the entire ecosystem. After the wolves were driven extinct in the region nearly years ago, scientists began to fully understand their role in the food web as a keystone species. When the gray wolf was eradicated from Yellowstone National Park in the s, more was lost than just the noble and fascinating predator. In the Valley of the Wolves Reintroduction of the.

When the grey wolf was reintroduced into the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem in , there was only one beaver colony in the park, said Doug Smith, a wildlife biologist in . gray wolves could be reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho, the process used to develop the alternatives, and the environmental consequences of implementing each alternative.

Three alternatives (Reintroduction of Experimental Populations [the FWS’s proposal], Wolf. A gray wolf watches biologists in Yellowstone National Park, shortly after they fitted it with a tracking collar.

The photo dates to , 9 years after wolves were first re-introduced to the U.S.

History of wolves in Yellowstone - Wikipedia